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Thread: Jump Starting ATX Power Supplies

  1. #1
    I am a little Sneezy
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    Exclamation Jump Starting ATX Power Supplies

    When you suspect that the PSU may be faulty it is handy to be able to test it. The following approach should allow the PSU to turn on and you can meaure the rails using a digital multi-meter (DMM) to confirm that the rails are within spec.

    To test your PSU you need to jump start the PSU using the green and black connectors as shown below. A bent paper clips works very well.

    Most PSU's have a minimum load requirement to power on. For this reason you must have at least some load on the PSU when you jump start it. A load like a fan or two usually works.

    What ever is used to jump the PSU, the green and black connectors must remain connected as long as the PSU is to stay on. Removing the paper clip will make the PSU shut down.

    Also make sure you have the PSU power switch "on" (at the back of the unit) and that it's plugged into an electrical socket.

    Note that older PSU or "store bought" systems may not have the same color wires or the connections in the same location. However a quick google search usually can turn up the correct connections for these PSU's.

    (based on advice provided by SteveOCZ - thanks)



    I didn't have a paperclip, so I've cut the ends off a safetypin.
    Bare in mind, that although on a good working PSU, you can plug this jumper in with the power connected, as the low amperage 5volt current cuts off in a nanosecond of being connected.
    If your testing the PSU because you have reason to believe it's faulty, then turn off the mains while you plug this jumper in.
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    Last edited by ol'norton; 02-22-2008 at 09:11 PM.




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  2. #2
    I am a little Sneezy
    • Snafu's Rig Specs
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD5-B3
      • CPU:
      • i5 2500k
      • memory:
      • 8GB Crucial
      • graphics:
      • EVGA 560
      • PSU:
      • Corsair 750w
      • Hard drives:
      • OCZ SSD 64GB + Seagate 1TB
      • case:
      • HAF
      • OS:
      • Win7 Ultimate
    Snafu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    ...don't wanna know where the other 6 are
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    Here is a link to a PSU tester Psu tester (note this link will take you to another site that is not necessarily endorsed - it simply had a tester listed for folks to reference).




    Snafu
    Profile - Webpage

    You can't live life without living - me

    Nothing is that important that it must be done today as long as you will wake up tomorrow - me


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